Unesco/Congress International of Dance

cid-logoThe Congress International on Dance (CID) was founded in 1973 within the

 

UNESCO headquarters in Paris, where it is based. CID is a branch of UNESCO (United Nations Education, Science, Cultural Organization) and was formed to preserve dance forms around the world.

 

CID has over 17,000 members globally and is the official organization for all forms of dance in all countries of the world. Its members are the most prominent federations, associations, schools, companies and individuals in more than 170 countries.

 

One must be nominated to become a member. Fernando Barros Lirola was nominated last summer while he was in Santa Fe. 

 

Fernando Barros Lirola spoke with president, dance historian and author Dr. Raftis Alkis, last January in Madrid, at which time Dr. Alkis asked him to write a description of flamenco in the Mediterranean region, which could supplement his new book on the history of dance in ancient Greece and the Byzantine. Although Fernando’s specialty is song, there is no disconnect for him between the music of the singer with dance and guitar.

 

Subsequently Fernando was invited to participate in the 42nd World Congress on Dance Research as a member of CID.

 

42nd World Congress on Dance Research                                                                               

Hallandale Beach, Miami, Florida. September 16th—20th, 2015

 

CID-UNESCO is hosting the 42nd International World Congress on Dance research. September 16th to 20th 2015 in Broward County, Florida, USA.

 
You are invited to attend the Hallandale Beach Annual Dance Congress 2015, to be held In Hallandale, Aventura, Miami, Florida USA. On September 16
th-20th, 2015. This unique event is open to all forms of dance: Ballet, Modern, Folks, Ballroom, Oriental, Argentine Tango, Ballroom Kompa, Therapeutical, Recreational, Revival etc.

 

Theme of the Congress is:  “Cultural Diversity – Communication, Tourism & Dance Medicine”

 

 The program includes: scientific research papers, lectures, workshops, video presentations, exhibitions, performances.

 

We welcome specialists in cultural studies, art historians, psychologists, sociologists, anthropologists, philosophers, Choreologist, Choreographers, dance teachers, dance therapists, dance film directors and professionals representing all forms of dance from all over the world.

 

President of CID Prof. Dr. Alkis Raftis & CID officials will attend.

 

For more information, call +1 505-603-0743

2018 PERFORMANCES


Department of Spanish & Portuguese, University New Mexico presents "Sephardic Cantigas": A Sephardic & Flamenco Concert 2/23/18 11 am

SEPHARDIC HERITAGE in FLAMENCO
To understand the influence of Sephardic music in flamenco we begin with the musical contribution of the Jewish community to the territory of the kingdoms of the Iberian peninsula. Historians illuminate and provide clues to better understand this stage of musical history.
Since music has always had a fundamental connection with religious rites and because we have evidence of the existence of Jewish communities from the time of the Phoenicians (1000 BCE), we can say that a characteristic music was beginning to germinate with influences from the contemporary music that flourished and was played throughout the Iberian peninsula centuries ago.
The Jewish communities that were expelled from their lands for religious reasons by Ferdinand and Isabella, “The Catholic Kings,” kept their rites, their customs, their Spanish language and of course their music. It is important to recognize what can be truly be called a labor of love: the cultural custodianship the Sephardic people carried out. It remains alive and well and which, thanks to their perseverance, we can enjoy today.
Sephardic music contains elements of both Arabic and Christian music. It is Arabic in the rhythm and musical instruments, and it is Christian in the words in which this music was sung, the Spanish language.

Fernando Barros: Singer and composer; Carlos Lomas: Guitar & Oud; Davo Bryant: Percussion; Melissa Moore: Narration

Sephardic Spanish-Jewish influence in FLAMENCO

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